Texas House Rep. Lynn Stucky’s drafted bills focus on Denton, second amendment rights

Texas House Rep. Lynn Stucky’s drafted bills focus on Denton, second amendment rights

Texas House Rep. Lynn Stucky’s drafted bills focus on Denton, second amendment rights
April 07
14:33 2017

Since the Texas state legislature convened on the second Tuesday in January, the newly elected Texas House representative Dr. Lynn Stucky of District 64 has been busy authoring or co-authoring 15 bills.

He was involved in drafting bills he said would “benefit Denton County,” like one aiming to count the number of middle school drop-outs in order to avoid further dropouts, another that will allow judges to carry firearms into a courtroom and one that will help along rapid development in Denton with a hotel occupancy bill aimed at promoting more tourism for the city.

Stucky said he and his staff are working diligently on getting those bills to pass legislation and get it to the governor’s desk.

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SIDEBAR: 

2445, Relating to the use of municipal hotel occupancy tax revenue in certain municipalities.

2486, Relating to restoration of the position of public employees when relieved of duty from the Texas military forces or a similar unit.

2519, Relating to a study on dropout prevention and recovery before the ninth grade.

2565, Relating to the powers and duties of the Big Sky Municipal Utility District of Denton County; providing authority to issue bonds and impose fees and taxes.

2566, Relating to the creation of the Denton County Municipal Utility District No. 9; granting a limited power of eminent domain; providing authority to issue bonds; providing authority to impose assessments, fees and taxes.

2654, Relating to the personal liability of certain elected officials under local government programs to fund water and energy savings improvements through assessments.

3451, Relating to the study and approval of lethal pesticides for feral hog control.

3922, Relating to the places where an active judicial officer may carry a handgun if the officer is licensed to carry a handgun.

150, In memory of Tyler Barnes Foster of Era.

189, Recognizing March 1, 2017, as Denton County Day at the State Capitol.

645, Congratulating Micah Pinson of Shady Shores on his selection as one of the top two youth volunteers in Texas by the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program.

977, Commending Jim Davenport, Jimmy Marquez and Alan Johnson for their work with Student Veteran Services at the University of North Texas.

1375, Relating to treatment and care provided by licensed medical professionals to animals in certain facilities.

2817, Relating to the punishment for the offense of criminal mischief involving the death of a head of cattle or a horse.

485, In memory of Lewisville City Council member Leroy Vaughn.

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He said the hotel occupancy tax bill will benefit the City of Denton for promoting more visitors to the fast-growing area. He said he’s making sure everyone involved is heard in order to perfect the language. His goal is to be transparent, effective and helpful for him to feel like it benefits district 64.

“What you’re doing more than anything is getting to know members and the rules, you’re also getting feedback from your constituents,” Stucky said. “You start slow, which is good, and I needed that to get into the swing of things. It took the same amount of time to get up to par as fast as anyone else and get into session.”

District representatives in Texas get paid $600 a month, which is the main reason Stucky said he comes home to focus on his animals, and because the process of every other year for the 140 day session was meant to be there for people who work in their community who want to give up five months of their time to represent their district.

“Most of us can’t live on $600 a month. I can’t live on $600 a month, I still have my business,” Stucky said. “Even while session is on, I come back and go on some ranch calls.”

The process of bill filing begins at the committee process, where public testimony is taken. Then, the bill is taken to the House floor, and is debated and voted on by the Texas House of Representatives. Then if it is passed, it goes to the Senate, where it goes through the same process over again. If the bill makes it to the end of the process, it is sent to the governor’s desk and is signed into law, or vetoed.

The House floor debates on Thursday nights, and goes into the early hours of Friday morning, if needed.

“Even though the process is grueling and long, they work through until the bill is passed,” Stucky said. “They don’t want to stop and start. They want to stay there and keep working until they agree what is in the best interest of the people.”

After the House floor closes and his Monday through Thursday work week ends, Stucky drives back where his veterinary practice is in Sanger to work with his patients for the weekend and go to church with his wife. It’s his veterinary knowledge that lead him to work on HB 3451, relating to the study and approval of lethal pesticides for feral hog control.

“I see a lot of sick dogs and cats that eat poisonous bait, they bleed internally and need a blood transfusion or they die,” Stucky said. “The Texas Department of Agriculture has released it to be used on hogs, they have not studied the impact of that on species and the environment.”

Stucky said that the hogs that consume the poison could be shot and eaten by humans and harm them, too.

As for his time in Austin and his new position, he said it has been an honor.

“Throughout the session I have had the opportunity to meet with hundreds of people from UNT, TWU, NCTC, the cities I represent and across other states on a number of issues,” Stucky said. “When I came into office my goal was to represent their interests, and I believe I have accomplished that to this point.”

Featured Image: Lynn Stucky, Republican state representative for District 64, mingles with supporters at Luigi’s Italian Restaurant. Around 100 people showed up to support multiple local Republican candidates and the then Republican nominee for President, Donald Trump. Hannah Breland

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Julia Falcon

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