Former UNT music student facing theft charges

Former UNT music student facing theft charges

Former UNT music student facing theft charges
August 27
01:31 2015

Julian Gill | Copy Editor

@JulianGillMusic

A former UNT music student is facing charges after reportedly stealing drum equipment worth between $500 and $1,500 from a student in the jazz studies program.

Music education sophomore Roberto Glasgow, who is not currently enrolled at the university, was arrested April 20 and charged with a class A misdemeanor after police found three cymbals, which belonged to One O’ Clock lab band drummer Connor Kent, in Glasgow’s practice room and apartment, according to a police report.

Glasgow was last identified as a music education sophomore, but officials confirmed he is no longer enrolled at the university. It is uncertain whether he was expelled from UNT due to the investigation or chose not to re-enroll this semester.

Kent said he had just finished a Latin jazz rehearsal on Nov. 11 when he left his equipment in the Music Building to pick up his car on Oak Street. Upon his return, he discovered the bag containing his four cymbals, drumsticks, mallets and brushes was missing.

“At first I thought ‘Ooh I bet someone is screwing with me’ because everything was there except for my one cymbal bag,” Kent said. “I thought it was really bizarre because if they were going to steal something, why wouldn’t they steal my snare drum or my other cymbal bags?”

Kent filed a report with UNT police after posting fliers around the university. But police were unable to find a suspect until six months later when another UNT drummer, Eric Pers, had his equipment stolen.

In late March, Pers lost two snare drums and six cymbals, which, he said, were locked in his practice room on campus. One of the cymbals was a rare 1950s Zildjian K, and it was so unique two of Pers’ friends noticed it while browsing through eBay.

Pers’ friends, who requested not to be named for this story, immediately notified him.

“Eric’s cymbal had a bunch of holes around the outside and a bunch of unique things only his had,” one friend said. “And we looked at the guy’s eBay page and noticed it was shipping out of a town about 30 minutes away.”

They couldn’t find any identifying information on the account, but after looking through previously sold items, they noticed a cymbal similar to one stolen from Kent.

“We started looking at some of the pictures of [the cymbals], and the walls in the pictures were walls in the UNT practice rooms,” they said. “That’s when we realized it was probably a student.”

The music practice rooms are reserved for students in the College of Music.

Pers’ friends notified UNT criminal investigator John DeLong, who was the detective overseeing Kent’s case. In an email, DeLong said he tracked the eBay account to Glasgow after Kent and Pers identified the cymbals.

According to the police report, DeLong went to Glasgow’s apartment on April 15 and asked permission to take his cymbals to make sure they weren’t stolen. Glasgow allowed DeLong to take the cymbals in both his apartment and practice room, the report said.

Kent was able to identify three of his four missing cymbals, despite major modifications.

“He had drilled four holes in my ride to give it a different sound,” Kent said. “And on my hi-hat, he used something to wipe the logo off to make it look different.”

Kent said the fourth cymbal, a Zildjian K Constantinople ride, had already been sold several times. After tracing it to a musician in Chicago, Kent was able to buy it back for $500. He said he originally paid about around $300 for it.

“That’s one of the things that you just couldn’t replace,” Kent said. “They still make Constantinoples, but they don’t make that model. It had aged really well.”

In Kent’s initial incident report, he claimed the total value of his stolen equipment was $1,947, with each cymbal worth at least $420. However, when the cymbals were recovered, the police report said Kent valued the equipment at $550 to $600.

“DeLong returned the cymbals to Kent and asked how much the cymbals are worth right now, he said between $550 and $600 for all three,” the report read.

Kent said that was incorrect, and he actually meant $550 for each cymbal, which would have made the theft a felony offense.

Pers, who declined to comment on the incident, has since recovered all of his equipment.

Both victims were acquainted with Glasgow through mutual involvement in the College of Music, as all of them were drummers. Pers was in a music history class with him, and Kent said Glasgow reached out to him before the fall 2014 semester asking for music recommendations.

Neither has heard from Glasgow since his arrest.

Glasgow was arrested on separate charges for both incidents¬: a felony charge on April 15th for Pers’ case, and a misdemeanor on April 20th for Kent’s case. Glasgow will meet with the district attorney in court on Sept. 24 to discuss the misdemeanor.

Editor’s Note: In the original post of this story, which also ran in print on Thursday, August 27, we identified Roberto Glasgow as a UNT student. That is incorrect. Glasgow is not currently enrolled at the university.

Featured Image: Sidney Johnson | Staff Photographer 

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